News

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    The education research of recent years has pointed overwhelmingly to the importance of teachers. Perhaps more than anything else – quality of principal, size of school, size of class – the strength or weakness of classroom teachers influences how much students learn and even how they fare later in life.

  • October 17, 2013

    A new study shows that public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired.

    Previous studies of pay-for-performance systems in public schools have found little to no correlation between merit-based pay and teacher performance.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    A study released Wednesday of the controversial teacher evaluation system that Rhee initiated when she was chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools has found that both its threats of dismissal and big pay incentives worked as intended. Within its first three years, the system led to increases in the retention and the performance of effective teachers while encouraging ineffective teachers either to quit or improve.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation's capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    New study of DC’s teacher evaluation program – IMPACT – out today (pdf). Getting a ride in The Times this morning. The researchers found positive effects associated with the evaluation system in D.C. and it’s a significant evaluation. Other than all the usual caveats about any study three things seem relevant here.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Every child deserves a great teacher. That’s why our schools need policies that support teachers’ development, keep our best teachers in the classroom, and counsel consistently ineffective teachers out of the classroom.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 16, 2013

    The share of American families living in either poor or affluent neighborhoods has doubled over the last four decades from 15% to 33%, according to an analysis of Census data by researchers Kendra Bischoff of Cornell University and Sean Reardon at Stanford University. The proportion living in affluent areas shot up from 7% in 1970 to 15% in 2009, while the share of families in poor neighborhoods more than doubled from 8% to 18%.

  • October 16, 2013

    Hundreds of teachers have been fired for poor performance since the evaluations were implemented four years ago. But low-scoring teachers who could have kept their jobs also have been more likely to leave than teachers who scored higher, according to the study, published as a working paper of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

  • October 14, 2013

    The Workshop on Poverty, Inequality and Education examines the challenges to closing the growing opportunity gap

    The widening income gap in the last three decades has led to a deepening academic divide between rich children and everyone else. But how exactly do the forces of rising inequality affect the educational opportunities and pathways of low-income and minority children? And can schooling still be the great American equalizer ensuring that all students can learn, develop and thrive?

  • October 09, 2013

    By Eric A. Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson

    As if we needed more evidence, new data released Tuesday shows the disheartening level of skills of the American worker compared with those in other developed countries. An assessment by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development shows that U.S. adults are near the bottom of the 23 participating countries in terms of literacy, numeracy and problem solving.

  • October 01, 2013

    By Nick Ahamed

    From SCOTUS’s Fisher v. University of Texas decision to the anniversary Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream Speech,” this summer was rife with claims that the post-racial era has come. True– minorities are better off than they were 50 years ago. But for anyone who saw the film “Fruitvale Station,” you’ll know that all are not yet equal under the law.

  • September 25, 2013

    Poverty and inequality are powerful forces that shape our children’s educational success and attainment of the American Dream. But inequality is not inevitable, and poverty is not destiny. Understanding the role of poverty and inequality in shaping opportunity—and the potential for families, schools, and society to expand opportunity—is essential to thinking about how we can ensure that all children have an equal chance to succeed in school and to lead productive, fulfilling lives.

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