News

Education gap between rich and poor is growing wider

September 22, 2015

Sean Reardon's work explains how the achievement gap exists before children start kindergarten, and research by Rachel Valentino, PhD ’15, reveals that public prekindergarten programs offer minorities and the poor a lower-quality education

Same Income, Different Neighborhood

June 29, 2015

It’s certainly not news to most sociologists that racial residential segregation in the United States remains high, and that economic segregation has increased considerably in recent decades. But how do these two patterns interact in the current residential landscape?

Poor whites live in richer neighborhoods than middle-class blacks and Latinos

June 24, 2015

Poor whites tend to live in more affluent neighborhoods than do middle- class blacks and Latinos, a situation that leaves those minorities more likely to contend with weaker schools, higher crime and greater social problems, according to a new study.

Middle-Class Black Families, in Low-Income Neighborhoods

June 24, 2015

“I was surprised by the magnitude,” said Sean Reardon, a professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and the paper’s lead author. “I thought comparing people at exactly the same income level would get rid of more of the neighborhood differences than it did.”

Stanford study finds blacks and Hispanics need higher incomes than whites to live in affluent neighborhoods

June 24, 2015

Sean Reardon's new research reveals troubling patterns of racial segregation that could constrain upward mobility for black and Hispanic families.

Maybe the Rich Don’t Care About the Middle Class Because They Don’t Live Near the Middle Class

March 24, 2015

When people say Americans are dividing along class lines, they usually mean it as a metaphor. But it's also true in a literal sense. When it comes to where we live, the rich, poor, and shrinking middle class have been moving further apart. Cornell University's Kendra Bischoff and Stanford University's Sean Reardon report that in 1970, 65 percent of U.S. families resided in middle-income neighborhoods. By 2009, that number was down to 42 percent. Meanwhile, the fraction of households in very affluent or very poor neighborhoods more than doubled.

Segregation’s Insidious New Look

February 27, 2015

Racial segregation dominated the American residential landscape for generations. We can’t afford, suggests the research of Stanford’s Sean Reardon, to let economic segregation have anywhere near as long a run.

Just how apart? And what does this apartness mean for the rest of us? Researchers like Stanford sociologist Sean Reardon and his collaborator Kendra Bischoff of Cornell have been exploring questions like these. Too Much editor Sam Pizzigati recently spoke with Reardon about our economic segregation — and why it so matters.

What the Rising Popularity in Dual Language Programs Could Mean for Dual Language

January 16, 2015

Recently, Stanford University researchers Rachel Valentino and Sean Reardon examined the academic achievement of dual language learners enrolled in four types of instructional programs: English Immersion (EI), Transitional Bilingual (TB), Developmental Bilingual (DB), and Dual Immersion (DI). Their study provided a unique picture of how instructional program type influences DLLs’ ELA and Math achievement trajectory from kindergarten entry through middle school. Importantly, it also captures variations between students of different ethnicities (Latino and Chinese) and initial English proficiency levels.

CEPA faculty score high marks on The 2015 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings

January 07, 2015

The 2015 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings were released this week and record number of CEPA faculty scores high marks on the list. Of the 200 education scholars ranked, 11 CEPA affiliate faculty and faculty made the list: Eric Hanushek (15), Martin Carnoy (24), Michael W. Kirst (31), Caroline Hoxby (33), Susanna Loeb (51), Sean Reardon (62), Rob Reich (94), Thomas Dee (119), Mitchell Stevens (127), Edward H. Haertel (154), Eric Bettinger (161)

Stanford receives two new endowed chairs in education

October 15, 2014

The newly created positions are intended to improve educational technology and provide greater equity in educational opportunities.

The Stanford Graduate School of Education has established two new endowed faculty chairs — one for the study of educational technology, the other for the study of poverty and inequality in education — and appointed, respectively, professors Dan Schwartz and Sean Reardon, as the inaugural recipients of these chairs.

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