News

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    When Michelle Rhee, then chancellor of the D.C. public schools, announced a radical plan to rate teachers’ effectiveness on a numerical scale, then fire the worst and give the best huge pay hikes, even her staff wondered whether it could possibly work.

    A study out Thursday concludes that it did — but skeptics remain unconvinced.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    The promise of a big bonus might seem like an obvious way to make employees improve their work, but there’s still a lot of debate over whether that strategy works with teachers. A new study out today shows that it can, under certain conditions.

  • October 17, 2013

    The District of Columbia's closely-watched system for evaluating teachers and providing bonus pay appears to have motivated weak teachers to make improvements, and to spur already-effective teachers to even higher levels of performance, a new study concludes.

  • October 17, 2013

    Few teacher evaluation reforms have been as contentious as the IMPACT system in D.C. Public Schools. But a new study published by Thomas Dee and James Wyckoff provides the first empirical evidence that the controversial policy could be encouraging effective teachers to stay in the classroom – and improve their practice.

  • October 17, 2013

    Before resigning as school chancellor in 2010, Michelle Rhee had already put in place a sweeping strategy that rated teachers' effectiveness in Washington D.C. on a numerical scale. The worst teachers were fired; successful teachers were given substantial bonuses (up to $25,000) and the district invested in instructional coaches in hopes of fostering teacher growth. Rhee's plan, known as Impact, evaluated nearly 6,500 school-based personnel in Washington.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    IMPACT, the controversial teacher-evaluation system recently introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools, appears to have caused hundreds of teachers in the district to improve their performance markedly while also encouraging some low-performing teachers to voluntarily leave the district's classrooms, according to a new study from the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education and the Stanford Graduate School of Education.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation's capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    New study counters earlier research showing performance pay is ineffective, and suggests that under certain conditions incentives influence behavior.

    IMPACT, the controversial teacher-evaluation system recently introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS), appears to have caused hundreds of teachers in the district to improve their performance markedly while also encouraging some low-performing teachers to voluntarily leave the district’s classrooms, according to a new study from the Stanford Graduate School of Education and the University of Virginia Curry School of Education. IMPACT is a performance-assessment system linking high-powered incentives and teacher evaluations.

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