News

  • October 17, 2013

    A new study shows that public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired.

    Previous studies of pay-for-performance systems in public schools have found little to no correlation between merit-based pay and teacher performance.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    The education research of recent years has pointed overwhelmingly to the importance of teachers. Perhaps more than anything else – quality of principal, size of school, size of class – the strength or weakness of classroom teachers influences how much students learn and even how they fare later in life.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation's capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    New study of DC’s teacher evaluation program – IMPACT – out today (pdf). Getting a ride in The Times this morning. The researchers found positive effects associated with the evaluation system in D.C. and it’s a significant evaluation. Other than all the usual caveats about any study three things seem relevant here.

  • October 17, 2013

    A study released Wednesday of the controversial teacher evaluation system that Rhee initiated when she was chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools has found that both its threats of dismissal and big pay incentives worked as intended. Within its first three years, the system led to increases in the retention and the performance of effective teachers while encouraging ineffective teachers either to quit or improve.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Every child deserves a great teacher. That’s why our schools need policies that support teachers’ development, keep our best teachers in the classroom, and counsel consistently ineffective teachers out of the classroom.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    A controversial teacher-evaluation system put in place by former District of Columbia Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee has done what it was supposed to do, according to new findings: It makes low-performing teachers leave the school system and improves the skills of those who stick around.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    When Michelle Rhee, then chancellor of the D.C. public schools, announced a radical plan to rate teachers’ effectiveness on a numerical scale, then fire the worst and give the best huge pay hikes, even her staff wondered whether it could possibly work.

    A study out Thursday concludes that it did — but skeptics remain unconvinced.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    The promise of a big bonus might seem like an obvious way to make employees improve their work, but there’s still a lot of debate over whether that strategy works with teachers. A new study out today shows that it can, under certain conditions.

  • October 17, 2013

    The District of Columbia's closely-watched system for evaluating teachers and providing bonus pay appears to have motivated weak teachers to make improvements, and to spur already-effective teachers to even higher levels of performance, a new study concludes.

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