News

  • October 17, 2013

    IMPACT, the controversial teacher-evaluation system recently introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools, appears to have caused hundreds of teachers in the district to improve their performance markedly while also encouraging some low-performing teachers to voluntarily leave the district's classrooms, according to a new study from the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education and the Stanford Graduate School of Education.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation's capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    New study counters earlier research showing performance pay is ineffective, and suggests that under certain conditions incentives influence behavior.

    IMPACT, the controversial teacher-evaluation system recently introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS), appears to have caused hundreds of teachers in the district to improve their performance markedly while also encouraging some low-performing teachers to voluntarily leave the district’s classrooms, according to a new study from the Stanford Graduate School of Education and the University of Virginia Curry School of Education. IMPACT is a performance-assessment system linking high-powered incentives and teacher evaluations.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation's capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    The education research of recent years has pointed overwhelmingly to the importance of teachers. Perhaps more than anything else – quality of principal, size of school, size of class – the strength or weakness of classroom teachers influences how much students learn and even how they fare later in life.

  • October 17, 2013

    A new study shows that public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired.

    Previous studies of pay-for-performance systems in public schools have found little to no correlation between merit-based pay and teacher performance.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    A study released Wednesday of the controversial teacher evaluation system that Rhee initiated when she was chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools has found that both its threats of dismissal and big pay incentives worked as intended. Within its first three years, the system led to increases in the retention and the performance of effective teachers while encouraging ineffective teachers either to quit or improve.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation's capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    New study of DC’s teacher evaluation program – IMPACT – out today (pdf). Getting a ride in The Times this morning. The researchers found positive effects associated with the evaluation system in D.C. and it’s a significant evaluation. Other than all the usual caveats about any study three things seem relevant here.

  • October 16, 2013

    Hundreds of teachers have been fired for poor performance since the evaluations were implemented four years ago. But low-scoring teachers who could have kept their jobs also have been more likely to leave than teachers who scored higher, according to the study, published as a working paper of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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