News

  • October 30, 2013
  • October 28, 2013

    Policymakers and reform advocates alike have rallied around introducing a set of national content standards, suggesting that this will jump start the stagnating achievement of U.S. students. As history clearly indicates, simply calling for students to know more is not the same as students actually knowing more. The largest problem is that the discussions of common core suck all of the air out of the room, distracting attention from any serious efforts to reform our schools.

  • October 25, 2013

    The number and variety of parties providing higher education services have exploded in recent years. With a wide array of new and often online options, college seekers need no longer assume that they will enroll on an ivy-trimmed physical campus. Nor can they assume that their private college is a tax-exempt organization. This panel will explore what this newly entrepreneurial higher education means for students, parents, academic professionals, and the legacy of higher education as a public good.

  • October 21, 2013

    THE TIMING couldn’t have been more propitious as Kaya Henderson delivered her first formal address since becoming D.C. school chancellor three years ago.

  • October 21, 2013
    , CNN

    New research show a controversial teacher evaluation system may actually work. In 2009, then chancellor of DC public schools, Michelle Rhee, implemented the "impact" system in a drastic move to save a failing school system.

  • October 21, 2013

    A new study by researchers at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education and the Stanford Graduate School of Education found that a controversial teacher evaluation system introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools has been a success.

  • October 21, 2013

    Study Finds D.C.'s Controversial Teacher- Evaluation System Is Working. The IMPACT system—started by Michelle Rhee when she was chancellor of Washington's public schools— has caused more low-performing teachers to leave the school system and seems to have improved the performance of both strong and weak teachers, according to a study by Thomas Dee of Stanford University's Graduate School of Education and James Wyckoff of the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia.

  • October 21, 2013

    Despite the glowing hyperbole in the media, Mercedes Schneider says there is nothing new in the results. The study is dated, there is missing data, the effects of the cheating scandal remain unknown, and the investigation of the cheating was turned over to an accounting firm with no experience in investigating cheating. Mercedes is not impressed.

  • October 20, 2013

    In October 2013, researchers Thomas Dee of Stanford University and James Wyckoff of the University of Virginia published (or by someone was somehow made public) a working paper on limited aspects of the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) teacher evaluation system, IMPACT, which was introduced in 2009– during the time that

  • October 18, 2013

    Thomas Dee talks to Gil Gross of Talk 910 KKSF AM on his recent study about incentives, selection and teacher performance in Washington DC.

  • October 18, 2013

    So, it turns out that Michelle Rhee knew what she was doing. Stanford’s Tom Dee and the University of Virginia’s Jim Wyckoff have just published an important study on Washington D.C.’s controversial teacher-evaluation system. They find that the IMPACT system launched by former chancellor Michelle Rhee appears to boost teacher effectiveness and also makes it more likely that low-performing teachers will depart. Deservedly, he study got a lot of attention yesterday, including in the New York Times and the Washington Post.

  • October 17, 2013

    Before resigning as school chancellor in 2010, Michelle Rhee had already put in place a sweeping strategy that rated teachers' effectiveness in Washington D.C. on a numerical scale. The worst teachers were fired; successful teachers were given substantial bonuses (up to $25,000) and the district invested in instructional coaches in hopes of fostering teacher growth. Rhee's plan, known as Impact, evaluated nearly 6,500 school-based personnel in Washington.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    IMPACT, the controversial teacher-evaluation system recently introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools, appears to have caused hundreds of teachers in the district to improve their performance markedly while also encouraging some low-performing teachers to voluntarily leave the district's classrooms, according to a new study from the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education and the Stanford Graduate School of Education.

  • October 17, 2013

    Public school teachersin the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they’re motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don’t want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

    The school system in the nation’s capital is unique among large school districts for the complexity of its teacher-evaluation system, which scores the performance of teachers based on classroom observations, student test scores and other factors.

  • October 17, 2013

    By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press

    Public school teachers in the District of Columbia are improving their performance because they're motivated by the possibility of substantial pay raises or because they don't want to get fired, according to an academic study of the groundbreaking teacher-evaluation system implemented by former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee.

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