News

  • November 09, 2013

    Although the wealthiest Americans have always lived in their own islands of privilege, sociologists and demographers say the degree to which today’s professional class resides in a world apart is a departure from earlier generations. People of widely different incomes and professions commonly lived close enough that they mingled at stores, sports arenas and school. In an era in which women had fewer educational and professional opportunities, lawyers married secretaries and doctors married nurses. Now, lawyers and doctors marry each other.

    A recent analysis of census data by sociologists Sean Reardon of Stanford and Kendra Bischoff of Cornell highlighted how middle-income neighborhoods have been fading away as more people live in areas that are either poor or affluent.

  • November 07, 2013
  • November 07, 2013

    ObamaCare isn't the only thing the Obama administration is spinning these days. In education, too, accomplishments on the ground don't match the rhetoric coming out of Washington. That's the main take-away from the latest results on student performance in math and reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, which the Education Department released on Thursday after some delay.

  • November 06, 2013
  • November 06, 2013

    Governor Christie's signature reforms have been in education. It's an issue that has helped the Republican reach out to minorities

    These efforts got a boost in October when independent researchers from Stanford University and the University of Virginia looked at a similar teacher tenure and rating system that's been in place for a few years now in Washington DC. The researchers found that the program was doing exactly what it was supposed to do: weed out the worst teachers and force the next lowest performing ones to improve. It's not a perfect system, but it's starting to get the right results.

  • November 05, 2013

    "It's difficult to write data up when they're controversial and you're not sure what to emphasize," said Susanna Loeb, a professor of education at Stanford University who was on the project's technical-advisory committee but didn't conduct any of the research. "I think there are a lot of interpretations about what the results mean. And the study doesn't tell you the effect of using any of these measures in teacher evaluation in practice."

  • October 31, 2013
  • October 31, 2013

    Fall brings the World Series, lots of football games, and–it would seem–almost as many reports on education. Here’s my summary of four recent studies, with close analysis of the most controversial, a study of Michelle Rhee’s IMPACT program in Washington, DC.

    These reports claim 1) The teaching force is more qualified than it was 20 years ago; 2) The nation is getting tough on teachers and teacher education; 3) The skill levels of many American adults leaves a lot to be desired; and 4) Getting tough on teachers works. With your permission, I will attempt to unravel these threads and, hopefully, find a common meaning.

  • October 30, 2013
  • October 28, 2013

    Policymakers and reform advocates alike have rallied around introducing a set of national content standards, suggesting that this will jump start the stagnating achievement of U.S. students. As history clearly indicates, simply calling for students to know more is not the same as students actually knowing more. The largest problem is that the discussions of common core suck all of the air out of the room, distracting attention from any serious efforts to reform our schools.

  • October 25, 2013

    The number and variety of parties providing higher education services have exploded in recent years. With a wide array of new and often online options, college seekers need no longer assume that they will enroll on an ivy-trimmed physical campus. Nor can they assume that their private college is a tax-exempt organization. This panel will explore what this newly entrepreneurial higher education means for students, parents, academic professionals, and the legacy of higher education as a public good.

  • October 21, 2013

    A new study by researchers at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education and the Stanford Graduate School of Education found that a controversial teacher evaluation system introduced in the District of Columbia Public Schools has been a success.

  • October 21, 2013

    Study Finds D.C.'s Controversial Teacher- Evaluation System Is Working. The IMPACT system—started by Michelle Rhee when she was chancellor of Washington's public schools— has caused more low-performing teachers to leave the school system and seems to have improved the performance of both strong and weak teachers, according to a study by Thomas Dee of Stanford University's Graduate School of Education and James Wyckoff of the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia.

  • October 21, 2013

    Despite the glowing hyperbole in the media, Mercedes Schneider says there is nothing new in the results. The study is dated, there is missing data, the effects of the cheating scandal remain unknown, and the investigation of the cheating was turned over to an accounting firm with no experience in investigating cheating. Mercedes is not impressed.

  • October 21, 2013

    THE TIMING couldn’t have been more propitious as Kaya Henderson delivered her first formal address since becoming D.C. school chancellor three years ago.

  • October 21, 2013
    , CNN

    New research show a controversial teacher evaluation system may actually work. In 2009, then chancellor of DC public schools, Michelle Rhee, implemented the "impact" system in a drastic move to save a failing school system.

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