Translating Evidence into Improvement
Translating Evidence into Improvement

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December 08, 2014 , The Huffington Post

The study, published last week in the journal Educational Researcher, looks at the average SAT scores of newly certified and hired teachers in New York state over the past 25 years. In analyzing the data, researchers found that average SAT scores for teachers began rising around 1999 relative to the rest of the population. The researchers caution that SAT scores are an imperfect measure of intelligence, though they contain useful insight.

November 23, 2014 , Imperial Valley News

Stanford researchers have created a promising new text-messaging program that is designed to support parents in their efforts to teach their children their ABCs and prepare them for kindergarten. The program, called READY4K!, sends weekly cell phone texts to parents of preschoolers to give them bite-sized tips and easy, specific actions related to developing early literacy skills.

"Texting is the medium du jour," said Benjamin York, a doctoral student at the Stanford Graduate School of Education, who created the texting program with Professor Susanna Loeb. "That could change, but for now, it seems to be the best strategy."

November 20, 2014 , Education Week

Who would have thought that texting—with all of its acronyms and emoticons—could actually improve a student's literacy skills?

But that's exactly what a new study of San Francisco preschoolers found. According to the study, released by the National Bureau of Economic Research, preschoolers whose parents received occasional text messages with reading tips performed better on literacy tests than their classmates whose parents did not receive those messages. Parents receiving those reading tips from the READY4K! text-messaging program also were more engaged in literacy activities at home and were more involved at their child's school as well.

November 15, 2014 , Stanford Graduate School of Education

Stanford researchers found that the texts, which prompted parents to engage in literacy activities with their kids, had a positive impact on learning.

When it comes to spending quality family time together, text messaging doesn’t have to be a villain. It could be an enabler.

Stanford researchers have created a promising new text-messaging program that is designed to support parents in their efforts to teach their children their ABCs and prepare them for kindergarten. The program, called READY4K!, sends weekly cell phone texts to parents of preschoolers to give them bite-sized tips and easy, specific actions related to developing early literacy skills.

November 14, 2014 , The New York Times

A new study shows that mobile technology may offer a cheap and effective solution. The research, released by the National Bureau of Economic Research this month, found that preschoolers whose parents received text messages with brief tips on reading to their children or helping them sound out letters and words performed better on literacy tests than children whose parents did not receive such messages.

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