Absolute versus Comparative Advantage: Consequences for Gender Gaps in STEM and College Access

Author/s: 
Prashant Loyalka, Yue Qu, Sean Sylvia, May Maani
Year of Publication: 
2016

Foreign-born children start with smaller awareness levels and higher ambiguity levels relative to their Italian counterparts and follow a ('biased') learning pattern whereby their level of belief ambiguity about general curricula tends to increase over time.A growing body of literature has measured and analyzed survey reports of youths' and (in fewer cases) parents' expectations for a range of outcomes relevant to educational decisions (e.g., see the reviews of Hartog and Diaz-Serrano (2014) andGiustinelli and Manski (2016)). The majority of these studies assess the 'validity' of survey reports of probabilistic expectations and/or use expectations measures to estimate microeconometric models of schooling or early career choices under uncertainty (e.g.,Dominitz and Manski (1996), Fischhoff et al. (2000), Arcidiacono et al. (2012), Zafar (2013, Wiswall and Zafar (2015a),Giustinelli (2016)). A smaller set of papers has elicited repeated measures of expectations over schooling decisions and their consequences to study how individuals form and update human capital-related expectations in real life rather than in the lab (e.g.,Stinebrickner (2012, 2014),Wiswall and Zafar (2015b)).

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APA Citation

Loyalka, P., Q., Yue, Sylvia, S., Maani, M. (2016). Absolute versus Comparative Advantage: Consequences for Gender Gaps in STEM and College Access.